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GENERAL INFORMATION

What is a visa?

A visa is a certificate issued by a relevant diplomatic mission or consular post of the Republic of Slovenia to a third-country national; if he/she has a visa, and there are no reasons to refuse him/her entry, he/she may enter the country and stay for the period specified in the visa. A visa may also be issued for transit through the territory of the Republic of Slovenia if the third-country national fulfils the conditions for transit and if he/she is allowed to enter the next destination country.

Visa types

The Slovenian authorities may issue three types of visa. The visa type is indicated on the visa sticker in a special section and marked with the letters A, C or D.

  • An airport transit visa (type A) is valid for transiting through the international transit areas of airports situated on the territory of EU Member States, but not for entering their territory;

  • A uniform visa (type C) entitles its holder to free movement throughout the entire territory of EU Member States;

  • A long-stay visa (type D) is issued to a third-country national who intends to obtain a residence permit in the Republic of Slovenia to reunite his/her family.

A family member who is not a national of an EU Member State may enter the Republic of Slovenia with a valid passport containing a long-stay visa (type D) to reunite a family with an EU citizen or Slovenian national, except when the third-country national is a national of a country with which Slovenia has established a non-visa regime, or when he/she is in possession of a valid passport and a residence permit issued by another Schengen State, unless otherwise determined by treaty.

 

The legal basis for issuing a short-stay visa is defined in the Visa Code (Official Journal of the European Union L 243/1 of 15 September 2009). The legal basis for issuing a long-stay visa is defined in the Aliens Act (ZTuj-2, Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia No. 50/2011).

 

A visa alone does not enable a third-country national to enter the country. If the circumstances under which a visa was issued have changed, border authorities may refuse entry and revoke the visa. A visa may also be annulled if it is subsequently established that the data submitted during the visa issuing procedure were incorrect or that important facts were concealed.

Who does not need a visa?

A short-stay visa (stay in the Schengen area of up to 90 days) is not required by:

1. Nationals of EU Member States or Contracting Parties to the Convention implementing the Schengen Agreement of 14 June 1985;
2. Nationals of third countries listed in Annex II to Council Regulation (EC) No. 539/2011 of 15 March 2001 (Official Journal of the European Union L 81 of 21 March 2001, pp. 1–7) listing the third countries whose nationals must be in possession of visas when crossing the external borders and those whose nationals are exempt from that requirement (including amendments);
3. Holders of diplomatic, service or special passports of countries with which the Republic of Slovenia has signed an agreement on the abolition of visa requirements;
4. Holders of valid Schengen visas (type C) or national visas (type D) of other Contracting Parties to the Convention implementing the Schengen Agreement of 14 June 1985;
5. Holders of valid residence permits issued by Schengen States, provided that these permits are included in the list of residence permits entitling their holders to travel without a visa;
6. Civilian flight crew members holding a licence issued under the Chicago Convention on International Civil Aviation of 7 December 1944 when performing their professional activity;
7. Stateless persons (whose status is defined by the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons) and recognised refugees (whose status is defined by the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, also known as the Geneva Convention), provided that the persons belonging to these categories are residents of an EU Member State and holders of valid travel documents issued by this EU Member State;
8. Stateless persons (whose status is defined by the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons) and recognised refugees (whose status is defined by the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, also known as the Geneva Convention), provided that the persons in these categories are residents of a third country listed in Annex II to Council Regulation (EC) No. 539/2001 of 15 March 2001 and holders of valid travel documents issued by this country (recognised refugees and stateless persons in countries whose nationals are exempt from the visa requirement when entering the Schengen area);
9. Students travelling in the context of a school excursion within the Schengen area who are nationals of a third country listed in Annex I to Council Regulation (EC) No. 539/2001 of 15 March 2001, provided that they are travelling in the context of a school excursion as members of a group of students accompanied by a teacher from the school in question.

 

Third-country nationals fulfilling one of the above conditions, except for Items 3 and 8, are entitled to free movement throughout the entire Schengen area for a period which does not exceed 90 days within a 180-day period. The visa-free regime for third-country nationals under Item 3 only applies to the territory of the Republic of Slovenia under the conditions listed in the international agreement which the Republic of Slovenia has concluded with the country in question. Holders of travel documents under Item 8 shall aquire information regarding a short-stay visa from the competent institutions of the member states they wish to travel to.

 

Detailed information on which third-country nationals require or do not require a visa to enter the Republic of Slovenia is available on the list of representations abroad .

When may a visa not be issued?

A visa may not be issued if a third-country national does not fulfil all statutory conditions. More information is available in the section What if I am refused a visa?. A short-stay visa cannot be issued if it is clear that the third-country national plans to stay in the Schengen area for a longer period, or if his/her stay is due to engagement in a gainful occupation.

 

A third-country national who wishes to enter the country for other purposes or stay in the country for a longer period than provided for by a visa must be in possession of a residence permit or a long-stay visa.

How is the validity of a visa determined?

The validity of a visa is determined by the period of validity, the period of authorised stay and the number of entries. Basic elements to be taken into consideration when deciding on the issue of a visa:

  • Period of validity: The period during which the visa holder may use the issued visa: Example: A visa is valid from 1 January–30 June, and during that period the holder may enter and must leave the territory of the EU Member States.
  • Period of authorised stay: The effective number of days that the visa holder may stay in the territory of the EU Member States during the period of validity of a visa. The period of authorised stay may range from 1 up to 90 days with a short-stay visa, and up to one year with a long-stay visa.
  • Number of entries: Refers to the number of entries that may be carried out during the period of validity of a visa while respecting the length of the authorised stay:

Examples:

  • One entry: A visa is valid from 1 January–30 June and allows for one entry. During this period the holder is allowed to travel once to the territory of the EU Member States; once he/she has left the territory of the EU Member States, he/she is not entitled to re-enter, even if the total number of authorised days of stay have not been used.
  • Two entries: A visa is valid from 1 January–30 June and allows for two entries. During this period the holder may be authorised to stay for a total period determined in the Duration of stay section of the visa sticker, divided into two separate trips.
  • Multiple entries: A visa is valid from 1 January–31 December and allows for multiple entries. During this period the holder is allowed to stay for the period determined in the Duration of stay section of the visa sticker within a period of six months, counting from the date of first entry. The stay can be divided into as many separate trips as wished by the visa holder.

An example of the above sections is available here (example 1a, 1b ).

Visa validity expires if the expiry date lapses, or if the third-country national uses the duration of stay permitted or the number of entries permitted. A visa becomes invalid if any of the above parameters have lapsed or been used.

Territorial validity of a visa

1. Visa C

If an applicant does not fulfil the entry conditions, or if an EU Member State under the prior consultation procedure objects to the issuance of a visa, the application is refused. However, when it is nevertheless considered necessary on humanitarian grounds, for reasons of national interest, or because of international obligations to do so, a visa with limited territorial validity may exceptionally be issued.

 

Example: The UN Secretary General has set up a meeting in Geneva (Switzerland) between a head of state subject to a visa ban and the opposition leader of a third country in order to find a negotiated solution to the political situation in the third country. The Swiss consulate decides to issue a visa for reasons of national interest.

 

In cases where it is deemed necessary to issue a new visa during the same 180-day period to an applicant who, over this 180-day period, has already stayed for 90 days on the basis of a uniform visa, a visa with limited territorial validity allowing for an additional stay during the same 180-day period may be issued.

 

Example: A Pakistani national stayed in Estonia from 15 March to 15 June, set up a research project and subsequently returned to Pakistan. Immediately after his departure, the Estonian project manager realises that the Pakistani scientist is needed, otherwise the project will fail.

 

In this case, a visa with limited territorial validity allowing for a stay of up to 90 days in Estonia may be issued.

 

An example of the section indicating visa territorial validity is available here (example 1d, 1e).

 

2. Visa D

A long-stay visa (type D) entitles a third-country national to enter and stay in the Republic of Slovenia during the entire visa validity period. A D-type visa also enables a third-country national to reside in the entire Schengen area for 90 days within any 180-day period, and not during the entire visa validity period.

Visa fees

The visa procedure fee for A- and C-type visas (airport transit visa, short-stay visa) is EUR 60. Diplomatic missions and consular posts of the Republic of Slovenia may also accept the fee in the counter-value of other convertible currencies used in the receiving country. The fee is the same for both types of visas at all diplomatic missions and consular posts of Schengen States.

 

A different visa fee amount may be fixed by international agreement. Such agreements currently obtain between the European Union and Albania, ArmeniaAzerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cape VerdeGeorgia, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, the Russian Federation, Serbia and Ukraine. For nationals of these countries, the visa fee - if not vaiwed for certain categories of applicants - is set to EUR 35.

 

The visa fee amount is independent of visa validity. The fee is collected with the visa application and is non-refundable. The diplomatic mission or consular post which accepted the application is obliged to deliver a confirmation of payment. If a visa is issued, the fee is indicated on the right side of the sticker, near the Remarks section.

 

The fee for issuing a long-stay visa (type D) for the Republic of Slovenia is governed by the Administrative Fees Act and is set at EUR 77.

Where do I apply for a visa?

Information on the diplomatic missions and consular posts of the Republic of Slovenia where you can submit your visa application is available in the Representations abroad section. Following its entry into the Schengen area, the Republic of Slovenia is also represented in the visa procedure by some other Schengen States. Thus, at locations where Slovenia does not have a diplomatic mission or consular post authorised for conducting visa procedures, you may apply at the representations of Schengen States entered in the List of Member States' consular presence, representation arrangements. In the table, the SI column provides information on missions of Schengen States representing Slovenia in the visa procedure at each location. If the code of the representing country is not available for a given location, representation has not been regulated. Persons requiring a visa to enter the Republic of Slovenia must therefore appear in person at one of the Slovenian diplomatic missions or consular posts. These are marked with the letter X in this column. It is not possible to apply for a long-stay visa at one of the representations abroad.

 

You may not apply for a visa at every diplomatic mission or consular post of the Republic of Slovenia. Applications may not be submitted at missions and permanent representations of the Republic of Slovenia to international organisations or at consulates general headed by honorary consuls or honorary consuls general.

 

SIS (Schengen Information System)